Engaging Minds Lecture – Holocaust Lecture

HOLOCAUST LECTURE

The Holocaust is the most infamous genocide in history. It came close to wiping out the entire Jewish population of Europe, but questions remain over who has a share in the responsibility for it.

After 1919, Jewish people in Germany were free and legally equal and often felt more German than Jewish. Many were wealthy and successful, but there was an undercurrent of anti-Semitism.

Hitler appealed to this anti-Semitism by blaming the Jewish people for Germany’s defeat in the First World War. Nazi race-scientists incorrectly claimed that the Jewish people were sub-human. As soon as Hitler came to power he introduced a programme of persecution. The Nuremberg Laws (1935) deprived Jewish people of many of their civil rights. After the outbreak of World War Two in 1939, the persecution of the Jewish people was increased.

Nobody knows exactly how many Jewish people died during the Holocaust, but the usual figure given is 6 million.

Engaging Minds Lecture – Sir Robert Winston

Verulam School St albans HertfordshirePROFESSOR OF SCIENCE AND SOCIETY

Lord Winston is Professor of Science and Society and Emeritus Professor of Fertility Studies at Imperial College London.

In the 1970s he developed gynaecological surgical techniques that improved fertility treatments. He later pioneered new treatments to improve in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and developed pre-implantation diagnosis. This allowed embryos to be screened for genetic diseases and has allowed parents carrying faulty genes to have children free of illnesses such as cystic fibrosis.

He now runs a research programme at the Institute of Reproductive and Developmental Biology at Imperial College that aims to improve human transplantation. Robert Winston has over 300 scientific publications about human reproduction and the early stages of pregnancy.

Robert Winston is also Chairman of the Genesis Research Trust – a charity which raised over £13 million to establish the Institute of Reproductive and Developmental Biology and which now funds high quality research into women’s health and babies.

Engaging Minds Lecture – Harriet Kelsall

Verulam School St albans Hertfordshire

Harriet Kelsall is one of the most respected bespoke designers and business trailblazers working in the UK jewellery industry today. She is the 2016 HSBC Forward Ladies Retail Business Woman of the year, was Everywoman’s “Retail Woman of the Year” in 2011, one of the IoD Director Magazine’s six “Women who have most changed the business world” in 2014 and is a Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths and of the City of London. She is the vice-chairman of the National Association of Jewellers and a non-executive director for both the Responsible Jewellery Council and the British Hallmarking Council.

She founded her business – Harriet Kelsall Bespoke Jewellery – in 1998 and since then it has grown to be one of the most respected UK jewellery companies with many national and international awards to its name, most recently the 2016 national Bridal Jeweller of the year award. As an innovator, she has revolutionised design within the jewellery industry, triggering an explosion in bespoke jewellery with her “Real design for the High Street” concept store in central Cambridge.

As a champion for ethics, the environment and CSR, she joined an industry where few cared about such matters. Since then she has tirelessly campaigned for improvement – in 2011 she helped launch Fairtrade Gold worldwide and her business became the firstin the world to be both Fairtrade licensed and certified by the Responsible Jewellery Council. She has been a regular keynote speaker on ethics and CSR at national events such as the BITC leadership summit and the Fair Luxury Conference and judges the national CSR Awards.

Harriet speaks up about equality for women within the workplace and on boards and also about maternity issues for entrepreneurs. Harriet is passionate about helping creative business flourish and is writing a book about how to start a one. She mentors other creative start-ups and as a successful dyslexic, she is an inspiration to others whose talents lie in creativity.